Oxycodone Oral Tablet Side Effects and How to Manage Them (2024)

If you have severe pain, you may be interested in learning more about oxycodone. It’s a generic prescription drug used in adults to treat pain severe enough to require an opioid medication. It’s also used when other drugs don’t work to ease severe pain.

Oxycodone comes as oral tablets and other forms that you swallow, such as capsules and a liquid solution. The drug is also available in combination products, such as oxycodone/acetaminophen. Some forms are immediate-release, which means the drug is immediately released in your body after you take it. Other forms are extended-release. These forms release the drug in your body slowly over time.

This article only covers the side effects of oxycodone immediate-release oral tablets.

The amount of time that you take oxycodone may depend on your condition. But it’s important to note that taking an opioid such as oxycodone long term can increase your risk of side effects.

Keep reading to learn about oxycodone’s side effects, also called adverse effects. For more information about oxycodone immediate-release oral tablets, see this in-depth article.

Some people may experience mild to serious side effects during their oxycodone treatment. Examples of oxycodone’s commonly reported side effects include:

  • headache
  • constipation*
  • nausea* or vomiting
  • itching*

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

It’s possible to experience mild side effects from taking oxycodone. Examples of mild side effects that have been reported with oxycodone include:

  • headache
  • dry mouth
  • sweating
  • dizziness
  • trouble sleeping
  • sleepiness
  • belly pain
  • constipation*
  • nausea* or vomiting
  • itching*
  • mild allergic reaction*

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

In most cases, these side effects should be temporary. And some may be easily managed. But if you have symptoms that are ongoing or bother you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. And do not stop taking oxycodone unless your doctor recommends it.

Oxycodone may cause mild side effects other than the ones listed above. See the drug’s prescribing information for details.

Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, it tracks side effects of the medication. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with oxycodone, visit MedWatch.

Although rare, it’s possible to develop serious side effects from taking oxycodone. Serious side effects that have been reported with oxycodone include:

  • euphoria (a state of extreme happiness or excitement)
  • low level of adrenal hormones
  • low blood pressure
  • seizures
  • heart problems, such as palpitations (a feeling of skipped or extra heartbeats)
  • boxed warnings:*
    • risk of respiratory depression
    • risk of overdose if accidentally taken
    • risk of problems if taken with certain drugs
    • risk of misuse and addiction
    • risk of neonate opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS)‡
  • drug dependence and withdrawal symptoms§
  • severe allergic reaction

* Oxycodone has boxed warnings for these side effects. These are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more about the first three boxed warnings listed, see the “Side effects explained” section below.
† To learn more about this boxed warning, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section below.
‡ To learn more about this boxed warning, see “Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking oxycodone” in the “Oxycodone warnings” section below.
§ To learn more about this side effect, see the “Can oxycodone cause withdrawal symptoms?” section below.
¶ To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

If you develop serious side effects while taking oxycodone, call your doctor right away. If the side effects seem life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number.

Taking opioid medications such as oxycodone for a long time can lead to drug dependence. With drug dependence, a person’s body gets used to a drug and needs it to function as usual. People who develop a dependence on oxycodone may have withdrawal symptoms if they suddenly stop taking it.

Oxycodone has a high potential for misuse and addiction.* If repeated regularly, misuse of this drug may also lead to dependence.

Withdrawal symptoms of oxycodone include:

  • anxiety
  • nausea or vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • changes in heart rate or blood pressure
  • trouble sleeping
  • stomach cramps

To help prevent withdrawal symptoms, do not stop taking oxycodone suddenly. If you want to stop taking oxycodone, talk with your doctor first. They’ll decrease your dosage of the drug over time to lower your risk of withdrawal symptoms.

If you develop withdrawal symptoms after you stop taking oxycodone, contact your doctor. They can recommend treatments to decrease these symptoms.

* Oxycodone has a boxed warning for risk of misuse and addiction. For more information about this boxed warning, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section below.

Learn more about some of the side effects oxycodone may cause.

Boxed warnings

Oxycodone has several boxed warnings, which are discussed below. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of misuse and addiction

It’s possible for people taking oxycodone to misuse the drug or develop an addiction to it. Misuse of a drug means using it in a different way than how it was prescribed. With drug addiction, a person keeps taking a drug even though it may be harming them.

For details about this boxed warning, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section below.

Risk of respiratory depression

Oxycodone can cause respiratory depression (extremely slow, shallow breathing). In some cases, this side effect can be severe or even life threatening.

You’re more likely to develop this side effect when you start taking the drug or your doctor increases your dosage. Specifically, your risk of this side effect is highest in the first 24 to 72 hours after starting treatment or after a dosage increase. It can also happen when you take too much oxycodone, which can occur even at prescribed doses.

What might help

Before you start taking oxycodone, your doctor will discuss the risk of respiratory depression with you. They’ll likely prescribe a low dose of oxycodone to start and slowly increase your dose as needed. This helps to reduce your risk of respiratory depression.

If you develop symptoms of respiratory depression, call 911 or go to a hospital right away.

While you’re taking oxycodone, your doctor may recommend keeping Narcan (naloxone) nasal spray on hand. It’s a drug used in emergency situations to treat a suspected or known opioid overdose, including symptoms of respiratory depression. You can request naloxone at your local pharmacy, or your doctor can write you a prescription for it. Your doctor or pharmacist can explain how to use this drug.

Even if you receive a dose of naloxone after respiratory depression occurs, it’s still important to go to a hospital right away. Naloxone only temporarily treats symptoms of opioid overdose, such as respiratory depression.

If you have questions or concerns about respiratory depression during oxycodone treatment, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Risk of overdose if accidentally taken

Accidentally taking oxycodone can cause an overdose. The risk of overdose is higher in people who have never taken opioid medication, and it is especially high in children.

Accidentally taking even one dose of oxycodone may cause serious side effects that can be life threatening. An example is respiratory depression.

What might help

If you’re taking oxycodone, keep the medication away from children or others who may accidentally take the drug.

You should also be aware of the symptoms of overdose, which include respiratory depression and sleepiness. If anyone who may have taken oxycodone is experiencing overdose symptoms, take them to a hospital right away. Your doctor can tell you what overdose symptoms to watch for.

In addition, your doctor may recommend keeping Narcan nasal spray on hand. It’s a drug used in emergency situations to treat a suspected or known opioid overdose. (For more information, see “Risk of respiratory depression” above.)

Risk of neonate opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS)

Taking opioid drugs such as oxycodone long term during pregnancy may cause neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) in newborns. NOWS causes opioid withdrawal symptoms, and it can be life threatening.

To learn more about this boxed warning, see “Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking oxycodone” in the “Oxycodone warnings” section below.

Risk of problems if taken with certain drugs

Oxycodone may interact with central nervous system (CNS) depressants or drugs that affect the CYP3A4 enzyme. These interactions may increase your risk of serious side effects.

Oxycodone and CNS depressants

Taking oxycodone with other CNS depressants may increase your risk of respiratory depression and coma. These side effects can be life threatening.

Examples of CNS depressants include:

  • benzodiazepines, such as Xanax (alprazolam) and Klonopin (clonazepam)
  • certain sleep medications, such as Ambien (zolpidem)
  • alcohol

Oxycodone and drugs that affect the CYP3A4 enzyme

In your body, the CYP3A4 enzyme breaks down oxycodone. Certain drugs called CYP3A4 inhibitors can prevent this enzyme from working. Taking oxycodone with this kind of drug may cause oxycodone to build up in your body, increasing the risk of overdose.

Examples of CYP3A4 inhibitors include:

  • Eryc (erythromycin)
  • ketoconazole
  • Norvir (ritonavir)

Other drugs, called CYP3A4 inducers, make the enzyme work faster. If you take this kind of drug with oxycodone, your body will break down oxycodone more quickly than usual. If you then stop treatment with the CYP3A4 inducer, your risk of overdose from oxycodone may increase.

Examples of CYP3A4 inducers include:

  • Rimactane (rifampin)
  • Tegretol (carbamazepine)
  • Dilantin (phenytoin)

What might help

Before starting treatment with oxycodone, it’s important to discuss any medications that you take with your doctor. This will help them determine if your other medications interact with oxycodone.

Due to the possible risks of taking oxycodone with a CNS depressant, your doctor may be very cautious in prescribing this combination of drugs. If you need to take oxycodone and a CNS depressant, your doctor will likely prescribe the lowest dose of both for the shortest time possible. They’ll also monitor you for signs and symptoms of respiratory depression and sleepiness.

In addition, your doctor may recommend keeping Narcan nasal spray on hand. It’s a drug used in emergency situations to treat a suspected or known opioid overdose. (For more information, see “Risk of respiratory depression” above.)

Constipation

You may have constipation from taking oxycodone. In studies of the drug, constipation was one of the more common side effects reported. If you take a higher dose of oxycodone, you may have a higher risk of this side effect.

What might help

If you develop constipation from taking oxycodone, tell your doctor. They may be able to recommend over-the-counter treatments that help to ease this side effect. An example is MiraLAX (polyethylene glycol).

You can also try some of the remedies discussed in this article.

Nausea

Oxycodone can cause nausea. In fact, nausea was one of the more common side effects that people taking oxycodone reported in studies. Taking a higher dose of oxycodone may increase your risk of this side effect.

What might help

If you have nausea after taking oxycodone, tell your doctor. They can discuss with you the best ways to treat this side effect. They may recommend taking a medication that can help with nausea. Or they may suggest reducing your dose of oxycodone to see if the nausea eases.

You may also find relief from nausea from home remedies, such as the ones in this article.

Itching

You may develop itching from taking oxycodone. In studies of the drug, this was one of the most commonly reported side effects. Higher doses of oxycodone may increase the risk of itching.

Itching may also be caused by other side effects of oxycodone, including an allergic reaction. (For details about this side effect, see the “Allergic reaction” section below.)

What might help

If you develop itching while taking oxycodone, tell your doctor. They can determine what may be causing your itching and suggest ways to treat this symptom.

To relieve itching, your doctor may recommend treatments similar to what you might use to treat an allergic reaction. Examples include over-the-counter medication you swallow, such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine), or a product you apply to your skin, such as hydrocortisone cream.

Allergic reaction

Like most drugs, oxycodone can cause an allergic reaction in some people. Symptoms can be mild to serious and can include:

  • skin rash
  • itching
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)
  • swelling under your skin, usually in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat, which can make it hard to breathe

What might help

If you have mild symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as a mild rash, call your doctor right away. They may suggest a treatment to manage your symptoms. Examples include:

  • an antihistamine you swallow, such as Benadryl
  • a product you apply to your skin, such as hydrocortisone cream

If your doctor confirms you’ve had a mild allergic reaction to oxycodone, they’ll decide whether you should continue using it.

If you have symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, such as swelling or trouble breathing, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. These symptoms could be life threatening and require immediate medical care.

If your doctor confirms you’ve had a serious allergic reaction to oxycodone, they may have you switch to a different treatment.

Keeping track of side effects

During your oxycodone treatment, consider taking notes on any side effects you’re having. You can then share this information with your doctor. This is especially helpful when you first start taking new drugs or using a combination of treatments.

Your side effect notes can include things such as:

  • what dose of the drug you were taking when you had the side effect
  • how soon you had the side effect after starting that dose
  • what your symptoms were
  • how it affected your daily activities
  • what other medications you were taking
  • any other information you feel is important

Keeping notes and sharing them with your doctor will help them learn more about how oxycodone affects you. They can then use this information to adjust your treatment plan if needed.

Get answers to some frequently asked questions about oxycodone’s side effects.

Will taking the lowest dose of oxycodone tablets (5 mg) decrease my risk of side effects such as feeling “high”?

Yes, taking the lowest dose of oxycodone tablets may decrease your risk of side effects, including feeling euphoric or “high.” The lowest available dose of oxycodone tablets is 5 milligrams (mg).

Even so, there’s still a risk of side effects occurring from a low dose of this medication. To decrease your risk of side effects, your doctor will recommend taking oxycodone for the shortest time possible at the lowest dose possible.

If you have questions or concerns about your risk of side effects from your dosage of oxycodone, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Does oxycodone cause long-term side effects?

Yes, it’s possible for oxycodone to cause long-term side effects. Examples include:

  • low level of adrenal hormones
  • seizures
  • heart problems, such as palpitations (a feeling of skipped or extra heartbeats)
  • drug dependence
  • misuse or addiction*

* Oxycodone has a boxed warning for risk of misuse and addiction. These are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more about this boxed warning, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section below.

If you have concerns about developing long-term side effects from taking oxycodone, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can recommend ways to reduce your risk of such side effects.

Can oxycodone cause hallucinations?

It’s unlikely that you’ll have hallucinations from taking oxycodone. Hallucinations weren’t a side effect reported in studies of oxycodone immediate-release tablets.

But studies of Oxycontin, a brand-name version of oxycodone extended-release tablets, did report this side effect. A review also suggests that opioid drugs such as oxycodone may cause hallucinations, though this is uncommon.

If you have any hallucinations during your treatment with oxycodone, talk with your doctor. They will try to find out what may be causing the hallucinations and the best ways to treat them.

Oxycodone has a high potential for misuse and addiction. In fact, the drug has a boxed warning for these risks. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Misuse of a drug means using it in a different way than how it was prescribed. An example is taking more than the recommended dosage. With drug addiction, a person keeps taking a drug even though it may be harming them.

Misuse and addiction may lead to dependence on a drug, though dependence can also occur from taking certain medications as prescribed. Drug dependence means a person’s body gets used to a drug and needs it to function as usual. If you develop a dependence on oxycodone and you suddenly stop taking it, you may have withdrawal symptoms. (For more information, see the “Can oxycodone cause withdrawal symptoms?” section above.)

In addition, misusing oxycodone may lead to an overdose, which can be life threatening. Oxycodone overdose symptoms include:

  • respiratory depression (extremely slow, shallow breathing)
  • sleepiness
  • slowed heart rate
  • low blood pressure

What might help

Because of its potential for misuse and addiction, oxycodone has a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) program. This is a drug safety program that the FDA requires for specific drugs. It’s designed to ensure that those drugs are used only when their benefits outweigh their risks.

In the case of opioid medications such as oxycodone, the REMS requires that drugmakers create educational programs for prescribers. These educational programs can help prescribers and their patients understand the potential for serious risks associated with opioid medications, including misuse and addiction.

Before you start taking oxycodone, tell your doctor if you have a history of drug misuse or addiction. They’ll recommend the best treatment plan for you to help prevent these problems. In some cases, they may recommend more frequent monitoring for misuse and addiction during treatment.

To help prevent misuse and addiction, your doctor will prescribe the lowest dose of oxycodone for the shortest time possible. If you feel that oxycodone isn’t working to manage your pain, do not take more oxycodone than prescribed. Instead, talk with your doctor. They can suggest changes to your treatment plan to better manage your pain.

If you have questions or concerns about oxycodone’s potential for misuse and addiction, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

In case of overdose

While you’re taking oxycodone, your doctor may recommend keeping Narcan (naloxone) nasal spray on hand. It’s a drug used in emergency situations to treat a suspected or known opioid overdose. You can request Narcan at your local pharmacy, or your doctor can write you a prescription for it.

If you have symptoms of overdose, seek emergency medical attention right away, even if you have Narcan on hand. This drug only temporarily treats the symptoms of opioid overdose.

Oxycodone comes with several warnings.

Boxed warnings

Oxycodone has several boxed warnings, which are discussed below. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of misuse and addiction. It’s possible for people taking oxycodone to misuse the drug or develop an addiction to it. Due to these risks, oxycodone has a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) program. This is a drug safety program that the FDA requires for specific drugs. It’s designed to ensure that those drugs are used only when their benefits outweigh their risks.

For details about this boxed warning, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section above.

Risk of respiratory depression. Oxycodone can cause respiratory depression (extremely slow, shallow breathing). In some cases, this side effect can be severe or even life threatening. For details about this boxed warning, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Risk of overdose if accidentally taken. People who take oxycodone accidentally may be at risk of overdose. In some cases, especially for children, this may be life threatening. For details about this boxed warning, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Risk of neonate opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS). Taking oxycodone for a period of time during pregnancy may cause NOWS. With NOWS, a newborn develops opioid withdrawal symptoms. In some cases, this can be life threatening. For details about this boxed warning, see “Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking oxycodone” below.

Risk of problems if taken with certain drugs. Taking oxycodone with central nervous system (CNS) depressants, such as benzodiazepines or alcohol, can increase your risk of certain side effects.

And taking oxycodone with drugs that affect a specific enzyme can increase or decrease the level of oxycodone in the body. This can also increase the risk of certain side effects, including serious ones such as respiratory depression.

For details about this boxed warning, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Other warnings

Oxycodone may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions. These are known as drug-condition interactions. Other factors may also affect whether oxycodone is a good treatment option for you.

Before you start taking oxycodone, talk with your doctor about your health history. This will help them determine whether this drug is a good treatment option for your pain. Factors to consider include those described below.

Head injury or seizures. Oxycodone can increase the amount of pressure in the brain and also increase the risk of seizures. In people who have a head injury or seizure disorder, oxycodone may worsen their condition. Before you take Oxycodone, tell your doctor if you have a head injury or seizure disorder. This will help them determine whether oxycodone is safe for you to take.

Digestive system problems. Oxycodone may not be safe for people with certain digestive system problems, such as bowel obstruction. If you have any digestive system problems, tell your doctor before starting oxycodone treatment. Your doctor will discuss with you whether oxycodone is a good treatment option for your pain.

Adrenal gland conditions. Oxycodone can cause a low level of adrenal hormones. If you have any conditions that affect your adrenal glands, such as Addison’s disease, tell your doctor before taking oxycodone. This medication may make your condition worse. Your doctor will let you know if oxycodone is safe for you to take in this case.

Urinary problems. Oxycodone may worsen certain urinary conditions, such as enlarged prostate. Before you start taking this drug, tell your doctor about any urinary problems you may have. They’ll discuss with you whether oxycodone is safe for you to take.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to oxycodone or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe oxycodone. Ask them what other medications are better options for you.

Thyroid problems. Oxycodone may worsen certain thyroid conditions, such as hypothyroidism. Tell your doctor about any thyroid conditions that you have before you start treatment with oxycodone. This will help them determine whether oxycodone is a good treatment option for your pain.

Pancreas or gallbladder problems. It’s possible for oxycodone to cause pancreas or gallbladder problems, including cholecystitis and pancreatitis. If you already have a condition that affects your pancreas or gallbladder, taking oxycodone may worsen your condition. In this case, your doctor can discuss with you whether oxycodone is safe for you to take.

History of drug misuse. Oxycodone has a boxed warning for its high potential for misuse and addiction. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). If you have a history of drug misuse, you may have an increased risk of this side effect while taking oxycodone. For more information, see the “Oxycodone and misuse” section above.

Lung problems or trouble breathing. Oxycodone has a boxed warning for respiratory depression. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). If you have any lung conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), tell your doctor before taking oxycodone. You may have an increased risk of this side effect. For more information, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Alcohol and oxycodone

You should not drink alcohol if you’re taking oxycodone. Both alcohol and oxycodone are CNS depressants. This means that both alcohol and oxycodone can cause similar effects, which may be serious or even life threatening.

In fact, oxycodone has a boxed warning about the risk of taking it with other CNS depressants, including alcohol. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Side effects that may occur when consuming alcohol while taking oxycodone include:

  • sleepiness
  • respiratory depression
  • low blood pressure
  • coma

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about the risks of drinking alcohol while taking oxycodone.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking oxycodone

Below you’ll find information on taking oxycodone during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Pregnancy and risk of neonate opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS)

Oxycodone is not safe to use during pregnancy, as it may cause a condition called neonate opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS). This drug has a boxed warning for this side effect. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Taking opioid drugs such as oxycodone for a long time during pregnancy can result in opioid dependence in a newborn, which may cause NOWS. With NOWS, a newborn develops opioid withdrawal symptoms. In some cases, this can be life threatening.

Babies born with NOWS will likely need hospitalization until their symptoms are managed. Symptoms of NOWS include:

  • irritability
  • irregular sleep pattern
  • high-pitched cry
  • vomiting or diarrhea
  • tremors
  • trouble gaining weight

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor before taking oxycodone. They’ll discuss with you the risks of taking this drug while pregnant.

Breastfeeding

Oxycodone can pass into breast milk. At this time, it’s not known exactly what effects this may have on a child who is breastfed by someone taking the drug.

But it’s possible that the drug could cause excessive sleepiness and trouble breathing in a breastfed child. If you take oxycodone while breastfeeding, your doctor will likely recommend monitoring your child for these symptoms. In some cases, they may recommend avoiding oxycodone if you’re breastfeeding.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the risks of doing so while taking oxycodone.

If you have any questions about side effects that oxycodone immediate-release tablets can cause, talk with your doctor. You can also ask them about Oxaydo or Roxicodone, which are brand-name versions of oxycodone immediate-release tablets.

A generic drug and its brand-name version are expected to have mostly the same side effects because they contain the same active ingredient. (An active ingredient is what makes a drug work.)

Before starting treatment with oxycodone, talk with your doctor about any side effects that you may experience. This will help you feel comfortable about taking this drug. Here are some questions to help get you started:

  • Is my risk of side effects higher when I first start treatment?
  • Does my risk of side effects from oxycodone depend on the dosage I take?
  • How do the side effects of oxycodone compare with other drugs used to treat pain?
  • Are there other pain relievers that will work well for me and don’t have as high a risk of misuse and addiction?

To learn more about oxycodone, see these articles:

  • All About Oxycodone IR Oral Tablet
  • Oxycodone and Cost: What You Need to Know

To get information on different conditions and tips for improving your health, subscribe to any of Healthline’s newsletters. You may also want to check out the online communities at Bezzy. It’s a place where people with certain conditions can find support and connect with others.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Oxycodone Oral Tablet Side Effects and How to Manage Them (2024)
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